Tag Archives: Stevie Mikayne

In the News for Evolved Publishing, May 22, 2014

Three Evolved Publishing Authors in the Spotlight

3D-JellicleGirlFirst, under the ongoing heading of “We Love Awards,” author Stevie Mikayne has been honored by the good folks at the National Indie Excellence Book Awards. They’ve named her debut novel, Jellicle Girl, a Finalist: Gay, Lesbian & Transgender Fiction. We think this is a richly-deserved award, and we thank the folks at the Indie Excellence Awards for recognizing the true quality of this excellent book.

National Indie Excellence Book Awards - 2014

You can get your copy online at any of the retailers linked below:

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3D-NZMammothTroubleSecond, author D. Robert Pease continues to earn high praise for his multiple award-winning Noah Zarc: Mammoth Trouble. This middle grade sci-fi adventure has captured the imagination of readers young and old alike. It’s true that its intended audience is kids 9-13 years old, with characters they can relate to and empathize with – yet adults are loving it too.

See what author and book reviewer SW Lothian has to say about this wonderful book at Seriously Awesome Adventures.

And of course, be sure to check out the full Noah Zarc series.

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For more information on this series, and on all of D. Robert Pease’s books, including links to the online retailer of your choice, please visit www.EvolvedPub.com/DRPeaseBooks/.

3D-TheDollMakerThird, author Majanka Verstraete sits down for an interview with The Writer’s Life eMagazine. She talks about the writing and publishing process, and what inspired her to write the Weirdville lower grade series of spooky adventures – chapter books for kids 6-10 years old. With three books already available, and three more coming in 2014, this is the perfect series for young kids who like a spooky tale – scary, but not too scary; in other words, fun scary.

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Be sure to check out the full Weirdville series at the book pages linked below:
The Doll Maker
House of Horrors
Fright Train

We hope you enjoy these wonderful books for readers of all ages, and as always… thank you.

Steff F. Kneff (aka Stevie Mikayne) Is Coming Out… as a Children’s Book Author!

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This guest post brought to you by author Steff F. Kneff.
 
 
What? Aren’t you a literary fiction author?

Yes! Mostly.

But after my daughter Emlyn was born, my aunt handed me a copy of The Jillian Jiggs Treasury….

I had no idea how impactful this bright, funny, slick-rhyming series of books would be on my pint-sized bundle. When we started reading, she practically took flight. She wiggled. She squirmed. Her arms rotated like propellers on a helicopter. I couldn’t even get a still photograph—her hands were nothing but a blur.

And that’s when I knew that I wanted to write something to make her smile like that.

Celebrating the Diversity!

— In the little blue house with the weathervane loose,
— Emlyn lived with her Mummy, her Mama, and Moose.
— That big old Blue Dane was a chicken at night.
— He hid in his fort when they turned out the light!

Emlyn has two mums (yep, that’s how her family is packaged), and while this is an important part of the story—especially for alternative families looking to see themselves reflected honestly in literature—it’s not the main point.

The story—captivating and original—is the main point.

I think diversity in literature is incredibly important, not only for children growing up in alternative families, but for all members of society. Why? Because diversity is not a politically correct catch-phrase, it’s our reality. Families come in all shapes, sizes and backgrounds. Let’s have that represented on our library shelves.

The most important thing for me, though, was to write a fabulous children’s story—one that spotlighted the focus on the main kid character—her adventures, her quirks, her interests. A classic in the making….

Who’s Going to Love this Book?

Kids! And parents!

Emlyn and the Gremlin is a series with mass audience appeal.

Does your child enjoy fun rhythmic writing? A cast of quirky characters? A giant scaredy-cat dog? A sarcastic little Gremlin who tosses a grappling hook over the window ledge to sneak in and play with forbidden toys?

Then Emlyn and the Gremlin is for your family too.

Children’s picture books aren’t just about the kids— they must appeal to the adults reading aloud every night, too. Parents will enjoy reading Emlyn and the Gremlin as much as the kids. (They might even sneak in a quiet preview on their way home from the bookstore.)

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Happy reading!

I hope to see you all at book signings in July.

<3 Steff F. Kneff

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Great Literary Fiction from Evolved Publishing

Strong writing is one of our greatest assets.

We at EP believe in the power of words, and that great writing, whatever the genre, is always a good thing. Indeed, we often lean toward the “literary,” as a matter of style, and many of our books can be classified as literary fiction, even if they cross over into other genres.

The following are just such books. Whatever other genres they occupy, we often think of them simply as literary fiction. You’ll find here great writing, exquisitely-drawn characters, deep inter-personal relationships – all the things great books have long offered to avid readers. We think you deserve the best, and while we think each and every one of our books stand up to any others within their genre, with quality always our first priority, the following books tend to fall more into a classical style of writing. We hope you enjoy them.

Just click on the cover or the title to go to the book’s main page, where you’ll find full descriptions, book details, retail links, and more.

Hannahs_Voice_300dpi_200x300Hannah’s Voice by Robb Grindstaff
Average Rating at Amazon = 4.7 Stars

When six-year-old Hannah’s brutal honesty is mistaken for lying, she stops speaking. Her family, her community, and eventually, the entire nation struggle to find meaning in her silence. Hannah stands at the intersection of anarchists and fundamentalists, between power politics and an FBI investigation. All she wants is to find her momma, a little peace and quiet, and maybe some pancakes.

Carry_Me_Away_300dpi_200x300Carry Me Away by Robb Grindstaff
Average Rating at Amazon = 4.7 Stars

Carrie Destin, a biracial military brat, learns the injuries she sustained in a car accident will prove fatal before she reaches adulthood. Facing an abbreviated life with a brash attitude and a biting, sometimes morbid sense of humor, Carrie races to experience life before it ends, but spirals out of control, leading to a physical and emotional collapse.

Desert_Rice_300dpi_200x300Desert Rice by Angela Scott
Average Rating at Amazon = 4.7 Stars

When Sam meets “Jesus”—who smells an awful lot like a horse—in the park, life takes a different turn. He saved her once, and may be willing to save Sam and her brother again, if only they admit what took place that fateful day in West Virginia. But Sam doesn’t remember, and Jacob isn’t talking.
 
Desert_Flower_300dpi_200x300Desert Flower by Angela Scott
Average Rating at Amazon = 4.8 Stars

Sam’s now a young woman of nineteen, trying to put the pieces of her life together, but the naked man in the desert spirals her world out of control, resurrecting past hurts and revealing old secrets. [Sequel to Desert Rice]
 
 
FMA_v3_300_DPI_200x300Forgive Me, Alex by Lane Diamond
Average Rating at Amazon = 4.6 Stars

…Now mortality, as it did seventeen years ago, lingers above me like the hangman’s noose. Yet it looms more ominous than ever, as if it will drop down around my neck at any moment. After all, I know the true Mitchell Norton. And whom shall I fear if not the devil, the grim torturer who conquered my aspirations and left me without a recognizable world of my own?….

Jellicle_Girl_300dpi_200x300Jellicle Girl by Stevie Mikayne
Average Rating at Amazon = 4.5 Stars

A young foster child with a wicked sense of humour and a devastating past reminds Beth that secrets seem powerful, but can destroy the person who holds them too close. Jellicle Girl is a powerful coming-of-age story about redemption, identity, and learning to let go of secrets that scar.
 
 
Weight_of_Earth_300dpi_200x300Weight of Earth by Stevie Mikayne
Average Rating at Amazon = 4.7 Stars

Ella’s mother refuses to talk about what happened—a secret Lydia also keeps tightly guarded, for reasons Ella doesn’t understand. A compelling story of how family loyalty entwines with personal secrecy, and what it means to be exceptional.
 
 
Torn_Together_v2_300dpi_200x300Torn Together by Emlyn Chand
Average Rating at Amazon = 4.3 Stars

Emlyn Chand’s first sojourn into Literary/New Adult fiction weaves a tale of friendship, dreams, and a lingering loss, while illustrating how our similarities often drive us apart.
 
 
 
White_Chalk_300dpi_200x300White Chalk by Pavarti K. Tyler
Average Rating at Amazon = 4.7 Stars

When Troy Christiansen walks into Chelle’s life, she’s desperate to believe his arrival will be her salvation. So much so, she forgets to save herself. Follow Chelle’s twisted tale of modern adolescence, as she travels down the rabbit hole into a reality none of us wants to admit actually exists.

The_Lone_Wolf_300dpi_200x298The Lone Wolf by E.D. Martin
Average Rating at Amazon = 4.6 Stars

After her husband’s infidelities are revealed, Kasey Sanford just wants to rediscover who she is. After an abusive childhood and years as a career soldier, Andrew Adams just wants someone to tell him that he’s doing the right thing with his life. When their paths cross, Kasey and Andrew embark on a tumultuous journey that demonstrates just what they’re willing to do to save the ones they love.

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Each of these books is bound to leave you with lasting images, and with characters you may not soon forget.

To stay up-to-date on Evolved Publishing news, including new releases, new authors, raffles and contests, etc, please subscribe to our newsletter.

Evolved Publishing Named “Publisher of the Year 2013” by Library at the End of the Universe

We had 3 of 4 authors in the Junior category (young adults, teens, and children), and 4 of 22 authors in the Adult and New Adult category.

Publisher of the YearIn the Junior category (click HERE), our winners were Michael Dadich, Emlyn Chand, and Majanka Verstraete. As each of these authors’ books includes illustrations, we would be remiss if we didn’t mention our talented artists: Mallory Rock, Sarah Shaw, and Noelle Giffin.

In the Adult and New Adult category (click HERE), our winners were Angela Scott, Robb Grindstaff, Stevie Mikayne, and Pavarti K. Tyler.

(To find all these talented individuals, please search the “Our Team” tab at the top of the page.)

And of course, we’re so pleased to have been named their Publisher of the Year for 2013. Thank you, Library at the End of the Universe!

Critically-Acclaimed Literary Fiction “Jellicle Girl” is on Sale!

We’re running a *99-CENT SALE* on the eBook of Jellicle Girl [Literary, Women’s, LGBT], only for the next 3 days, and only at Amazon and at Barnes and Noble.

To celebrate this event, Author Stevie Mikayne has dropped by to share the following guest post with you:

Yes, writers steal ideas from television.

During pregnancy and the first month of my newborn’s life, I watched more television than I had since childhood. Never mind how long ago that was… suffice it to say that years have passed since I flaked out for this many hours in front of the tube.

Why? Hyperemesis that lasted from five weeks into pregnancy until four weeks postpartum. Yes, honestly.

What did I watch? Cooking shows, ironically. And mysteries. Particularly a series called Castle, in which a bestselling mystery writer follows around an NYPD detective and helps her solve murders. I like this show because it’s distracting. What strikes me in particular about the writer (Castle) is that he flagrantly steals the lives of his co-workers to create characters for his books… and then writes sex scenes about said characters, making no attempt to deny that they are, in fact, based on real people.

Real writers don’t do this. We oscillate. We obfuscate. We equivocate when asked “how much of this is fiction?” When Jellicle Girl was released, everyone wanted to know – how much of that is real? I did not answer that question. Not even when my publicist asked me. Why? Because people like to guess, and it’s no fair to ruin their fun by telling them. Yes, of course that’s the real reason.

One consistent element that readers appreciate about Jellicle Girl is the strong characterisation: the characters just feel so real, they tell me. Why would I undermine their admiration of my “writing skills” by admitting that of course they’re based on real people?

Not all of them, just some.

E has no real life counterpart. Beth’s imaginary friend (or symptom of her borderline break with reality, whichever way you choose to interpret it) was born out of my obsession with Star Trek Voyager. I imagined Beth’s future self beaming in from the future to impart wisdom to my struggling teenage protagonist, much like Captain Janeway in the last episode of STV (I did mention that I’d been watching an awful lot of TV lately…?). I later decided that a futuristic Beth was a bit too strange a pill for my readers to swallow, so modified the idea to something more palatable. But if Jellicle Girl was ever made into a movie, I’d still insist E be played by Kate Mulgrew.

Some of the story line is based on personal experience. I too had a difficult time as a teenager. Like Beth, I left home at age sixteen; unlike Beth, I never dwelled alone in my father’s bachelor pad while he toured the world shooting pictures. Instead, I travelled between my grandparents’ home, and my best friend’s downtown condo, where her mother kept me in line as much as possible.

My best friend’s mother became my real-life inspiration for Dr. Nancy Sullivan. A lawyer in the 1960s, when such a profession was practically unheard of for an Australian woman, she faced her life with an ironic wit that few could understand and almost nobody could match. I could have probably just based the character on her personality alone and kept her identity a secret—but for me, one of the most important characteristics of the real-life woman was the battle she faced every day, debilitated by a rare and crippling form of Multiple Sclerosis.

She guided me back from more than one dangerous path with nothing more than a raised eyebrow and a sharp comment. This was important as, by that time, she had become a spastic quadriplegic and couldn’t so much as pick up a glass without help. Watching her decline and eventually succumb to MS left a lifelong and devastating impression on me.

Apparently she made quite an impression as a literary personality as well, because Dr. Sullivan ranks top among readers’ favourite Jellicle Girl characters. I miss her all the time, but I’m proud to see her somewhat immortalized in a gorgeous hardcover.

Want to know what else has a real-life connection? Like “is there really a coffee kiosk underground?” Ask me in the comments section – I might just break my own rules and answer you. Give me a few hours to get to it though—I’m probably watching Castle!

Stevie 🙂